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- A young man arrives in Hollywood during the 1930s hoping to work in the film industry. There, he falls in love, and finds himself swept up in the vibrant café society that defined the spirit of the age. Kristen is the celebrity face of the new CHANEL Fragrance

LIZZIE Coming 2018
- A young woman goes on a notorious ax-murdering rampage in Massachusetts at the turn of the century. Kristen as Bridget Sullivan

- 19-year-old Billy Lynn is brought home for a victory tour after a harrowing Iraq battle. Through flashbacks the film shows what really happened to his squad - contrasting the realities of war with America's perceptions. Kristen as Kathryn

UNDERWATER Coming 2018
- A crew of underwater researchers must scramble to safety after an earthquake devastates their subterranean laboratory. Kristen as Norah

CHARLIE'S ANGELS Recently Announced
- Plot unknown. Reboot of the 2000 action comedy based on the 1970s TV series. Kristen as ???

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002. - This is a gossip/rumor-free fan site, so please don't bring any drama here.

003. - Please no links in the chat. For example if new photos appear, please don't link to the images. All new images will be added to our Gallery. It defeats the purpose of us sharing things with fans, if you're directing people else where. is ran by ONE fan, so sometimes we aren't as quick as other fan sites who have multiple owners who can post updates much quicker. If the admin asks for a link, then do so by all means. Please no website promoting - if you want us to see your website, then you can apply to be affiliates Is a non-profit fansite which is run by a fan and not by Kristen Stewart or anyone from her Family or Management. This is not an official website and we have no direct contact to Kristen, so please don't contact us with fan mail as we cannot pass it on. This website is here for the fans benefit - we are here to purely share our love with other fans only and to keep fans updated on Kristen's career. All photos and media found on this website belong to their respectful owners - No copyright infringement is intended, but if you find anything on this website that belongs to you and you want it removed, please Contact Us before taking any legal action and we shall remove it right away.

Kristen Stewart 2010-2018 | Your online source for Kristen Stewart
► ??? TBA – Dates coming soon ► ??? TBA – Dates coming soon ► ??? TBA – Dates coming soon ► ??? TBA – Dates coming soon ► APRIL 9 – Kristen's 28th Birthday
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Here are new pics of Kristen at LAX Airport in Los Angeles (January 17th) catching a flight to Utah, for the Sundance Film Festival

* We no longer post paparazzi images directly on our website anymore. This is to avoid any possible copyright infringement over the images. Instead, we share gallery links from Twitter where you can view the images.

January 19th – At LAX Airport, Los Angeles

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Here is the first preview trailer for Come Swim – Kristen’s first directorial movie, as well as a behind the scenes look at Kristen in action

It was also announced today that “Come Swim” will be headed to the Cannes Film festival in May

Other Projects – Directorials – Come Swim – Behind The Scenes


We have some new movie news. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Kristen will star in JT Leroy alongside James Franco and Helena Bonham Carter.

via The Hollywood Reporter – Fortitude will launch the project to foreign buyers at Berlin’s European Film Market; Justin Kelly is writing and directing.

Kristen Stewart, James Franco and Helena Bonham Carter are circling the biopic JT Leroy, a Hollywood-set transgender story.

Justin Kelly, who directed James Franco in 2015’s I Am Michael, will helm the film from a script he wrote. The true story goes behind the scenes of the hoax of JT LeRoy, a woman who pretended to be a man who identifies as transgender, tricking the rich and famous in Hollywood, the fashion world and elite literary circles.

The biopic will be based on memoir and life rights of Savannah Kroop, who was behind the complicated ruse. LBI Entertainment, Aquarius and Rabbit Bandini Productions are producing with Aquarius providing equity financing.

Franco is attached while Stewart and Carter are currently in negotiations. Fortitude International will launch the project to foreign buyers at Berlin’s European Film Market, with a 2016 production start date planned. CAA is repping domestic rights.

Kelly is no stranger to bringing fascinating real-life tales to the big screen. I am Michael, which was based on New York Times Magazine article My Ex-Gay Friend, centered on a man, Michael Glatze, a gay activist who renounced homosexuality after he became a Christian pastor. It screened at both Sundance and Berlin in 2015. He’s repped by CAA and LBI Entertainment.

Following up her strong performances in 2014 films Clouds of Sils Maria and Still Alice, Stewart was most recently seen in American Ultra with Jesse Eisenberg, Equals (which premiered in Toronto) with Nicholas Hoult and Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women, which premiered at Sundance. Her other upcoming projects include Woody Allen’s next feature, Ang Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk and reuniting with director Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. She’s repped by Gersh and McKuin Frankel Whitehead.

Franco will star in the Hulu TV miniseries 11.22.63, and his other upcoming work includes The Disaster Artist, which he directed and stars in as Room director Tommy Wiseau. He also directed and stars in The Long Home, which also features Josh Hartnett, Josh Hutcherson and Ashton Kutcher. The always-busy actor-director will soon shoot Why Him?, a comedy also starring Bryan Cranston and Zoey Deutch. He’s repped by CAA, Untitled Entertainment and Sloane, Offer.

Carter starred in Suffragette and Cinderella and next will be seen in Disney’s Alice Through the Looking Glass. She’s also attached to Sony’s 55 Steps. She’s repped by WME and MGMT Entertainment.


Here are new photos of Kristen arriving at LAX Airport, Los Angeles yesterday (January 25th) after finishing up at the Sundance Film Festival

* We no longer post paparazzi images directly on our website anymore. This is to avoid any possible copyright infringement over the images. Instead, we share gallery links from Twitter where you can view the images.

January 25th- Arriving at LAX Airport, Los Angeles

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Here are new candids of Kristen out in Park City, Utah during the Sundance Film Festival (January 25th) aswell as a second set of pics of Kristen at the Airport later in the day catching a flight

Candids – 2016 – January 25th – Out in Park City, Utah at the Sundance Film Festival

Candids – 2016 – January 25th – Departing Salt Lake City, Utah at the Sundance Film Festival

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Here are new pics of Kristen arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah today (January 24th) for the Sundance Film Festival

Candids – 2016 – Arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah

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via – Kristen Stewart has a come a long way since the “Twilight” franchise that launched her fame into the stratosphere. The hit series only wrapped two years ago, and already Stewart has distanced herself from the films that made her name by appearing in a number of smaller projects this year that prove her worth as an actress.

She kicked off 2014 by wowing in the Sundance Guantanamo Bay drama “Camp X-Ray,” soon followed by Cannes where she held her own opposite Juliette Binoche in Olivier Assayas’ latest “Clouds of Sils Maria.” That project drew career-best raves for Stewart, and the goodwill continued when her latest film, “Still Alice,” screened in Toronto where it was swiftly acquired by Sony Pictures Classics for distribution. In the devastating drama, Stewart plays Lydia, a struggling actress and daughter to a renowned linguistics professor (Julianne Moore) struggling with early onset Alzheimers. It’s Moore’s picture, but Stewart leaves a distinct mark as a young woman forced to cope with inevitable tragedy. The film was directed by partners Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland. The former is living with ALS.

Did “Still Alice” strike a chord for you personally? Is there anyone you know who suffered through something similar?
I very fortunately have never experienced that personally. I’ve never had a loved one who has had to traverse the very scary path that one must who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. I did have one very formative experience as a young kid with an older lady, a mother of a family friend, who was clearly in a severe state of dementia. In retrospect, I have no idea if it was Alzheimer’s or not, but she was clearly gone. She had clearly lost parts of herself, and what remained was very desperate to connect. I was 12 and I walked into this room and started hanging with this lady, and I soon came to realize there was this lapse, yet there was this really real, almost desperate awareness over the fact she was treasuring these moments because they were about to leave her. Then we had dinner, and everyone at the table ignored her and was treating her as if she didn’t exist, but I had just met her and I had seen her personality, her soul, her presence, her essence – it was all so clear to me. And it was all being taken for granted so much at this table. I remembered this for a long time. I told this story long before I read the script for “Still Alice.” I just couldn’t forget it.

When I read this script and met with the directors, I felt like I had to prove myself that I was worthy to play such a special person, because Lydia is endowed with something that not everyone is in that she can deal, she can focus on the positive and the light and not make things so black-and-white; she can take things for what they are and enjoy them and appreciate them without having to call them a name. She lives in the ambiguity and can appreciate it, and I feel very similar. And it was a perfectly clear test considering Wash and Rich are dealing with something entirely similar and just as grotesquely scary and devastating. With someone with ALS, they just get sort of brushed over and ignored all the time. It’s hard to acknowledge. It’s easier not too. And Rich is the smartest person in the room, so when I met with them and we found ourselves mutually wanting to work together, we knew we had to do it.

I also knew I could do it with Julie [Julianne] because I’ve known her for a couple years. I knew I could be her kid. I just knew that everything was going to be honest and right. We weren’t making anything up, so it would be heavy.

Everyone always asks, “How did this movie change you? What did it give you?” And it gives you in the most basic sense a fundamental perspective. You want to go home and call your mom, or you want to stop being so petty. It gives you this massive jug of perspective.

My biggest fear in life is death, and right up there is losing my memory. I know you don’t play Alice, but was the process of making this film extremely difficult? Or was it a pleasure to make given who you got to work with?
I have to say it was both. I was watching Julie work so hard. The only way someone could pull this off and not be associated with Alzheimer’s is due to them being a sheer genius and just being multi-faceted. You have to have such imagination and the wildest control over your body. One thing that made it easier, and really painful in the most correct way, was to see someone like Julie be so strong and so capable and so vital. The notion that they could ever lose that, because she was also playing someone who was just as impressive as a woman, it made it harder to see Julie go through that because she is what she is. The idea that that could happen to anyone – me, you, someone who you idolize, someone who is entirely in control all the time – it was not acting, it was so real. Anyone, even if you don’t have personal experience with the disease, you have a mom. I have a mom, so I know what that experience feels like. I understand what it would feel like to lose her.

I think also the most important part of the movie is understanding the disease. When you’re young, and this is just dumb but it’s also plain normal, you hear kids saying, “Old timer’s disease,” and it’s just simply not. It’s easer to cast aside and say they’re just old, but no, this is a really ravaging disease and it can happen to someone really young. I was unaware of that. People know about early onset Alzheimer’s, but I didn’t know how common it is. It’s absolutely rampant and easy to ignore, which is a terrible combination. I learned a lot. I’m glad to be a part of something that’s getting that out there.

What are you most fearful of?
I think we’re all pretty afraid of dying and the unknown. But I think the scariest thing about this disease and watching this movie is how alone you are before you die. You’ve lost your life before you’re dead. The idea that I might overlook something in my life and make someone feel that way scares me.

You’ve now worked with two of the best actresses in the business – Julianne Moore and Juliette Binoche (in “The Clouds of Sils Maria”). What did you pick up from working with both ladies?
To be in the presence of people like that who are so talented, even despite age, that’s absolutely going to shape you and motivate you. I loved working with Julie because I felt there was a serious commonality in terms of how we reach our goals in acting. Juliette, on the other hand, just floored me. She achieved this greatness by means that I don’t understand. I love her for that. She perplexes me and she keeps me going and keeps me asking questions. Juliette kind of drives me crazy, whereas Julie has such attention to detail. The way she manages losing herself and finding herself with such precision is like she is a soulful surgeon.

I’m so aware of the camera. I always want to collaborate with the director and the DP and all the other actors. I want to talk about everything too much. But in this case I actually felt affirmed, because we think the same and really approached it the same way. It made me feel so much better because I want to achieve what she achieved. I want to do things that feel undeniably real and un-ignorable. She’s done that because of who she is. I felt such a bond and a friendship there. It gave me confidence. I don’t need to immerse myself so greatly in something where I don’t know where I am. I want to know where I am. The reason she is better than most people is because she has the mind to manage all of it. I admire her for that.

It sounds like in many ways your working relationship with the actresses kind of mirrors the characters you play in both projects. In “Still Alice,” you play Julie’s daughter, so you’re obviously going to share similar same traits. With Juliette, you’re her employee and you look up to her as this mysterious figure of sorts.
Absolutely! It’s as if it was planned.

The character you play in “Still Alice” is an actress, meaning she shares a lot of the same ambitions that you do, and her personal sense of style — and please forgive me if I’m wrong — seems to mirror the one I’ve seen you adopting over these past couple of years. Would you say you share a lot in common with Lydia, more so than any other character you’ve played?
I’ve played a couple parts that have felt drastically different from myself, primarily the parts where I’ve had to play someone who has existed in reality, so people like Joan Jett [in “The Runaways”] and Luanne Henderson [in “On the Road”]. There were certainly elements of those people I could relate to, there were parts of myself that were similar and that I found because of them, but it wasn’t me. It was absolutely a departure for me.

I don’t think I can ever step outside myself fully. It’s not the type of acting I want to do. I’ve been lucky enough to be allowed to do this. Everyone can tell me that I run my hand through my hair too much, and that’s fine because I’m truly there and very present in these moments. With the roles I’ve been playing, especially recently in films like “Sils Maria” and “Still Alice,” the way to do those parts justice is to just really be them and to learn the things they’re learning. You got to walk in their shoes for real and experience what they experience. In that regard, I didn’t feel like I was playing characters. They were so there for me, I just wanted to live in them.

Kids nowadays, we all dress the same. If you’re trying to be an actor and you come to LA, you’re probably wearing skinny jeans and a t-shirt. So I didn’t want to riddle her with shit that was going to distract you from the honesty of the relationship. So it definitely resembles me because I didn’t try otherwise. There was no effort on my part to hide myself [in “Still Alice”]. All I tried to do with this part was to find myself and show myself. The best way to service this character was to be there honestly, so all affectations were meaningless. I could just have my own. It was selfishly a personal experience, but it had to be so that the viewer would feel it as well. I didn’t need to play a character who was outside myself.

The performances that hit most, even if they are craftily designed by someone and executed perfectly, it’s really the soul and honesty that gets across most. My purpose was to support and serve Julie, so I was really just me. I was playing her daughter for real.

Because of that very personal approach you take to the material, the people you play must be hard to let go off once shooting wraps.
Absolutely. Julie and I will now know each other in a way that we wouldn’t have had an opportunity to, and appreciate each other in a way we wouldn’t have had the opportunity to, and appreciate the subject matter in a way we wouldn’t have had the opportunity to. I said before that I didn’t have a personal experience with Alzheimer’s, but now I do. Not to generalize, but more so than most projects, something like this shapes you. I had the beautiful opportunity to stand up to something difficult and we all triumphed and did something positive out of something that is quite dark.


Kristen is doing press today, and sat down with MTV’s Josh Horowitz who took time to take another one of his traditional happy/sad/confused pics with Kristen (if you don’t know.. Josh takes these same photos with every celebrity he interviews and posts to his instagram account.. he did another one with Kristen at Sundance back in January)


Happy/Sad/Confused. With Kristen Stewart. #happysadconfused #kristenstewart Photo: @colindouglasgray

Exibir no Instagram


Sony Pictures Classics plans on pushing a Best supporting Actress Oscars nomination for Kristen, for her
role as Lydia in her upcoming movie Still Alice. Feeling so proud of Kristen right now for all of the praise 🙂

via –
SPC will push the 24-year-old for a best supporting actress nom, one of several it hopes to land alongside an all-but-assured best actress mention for Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore, this year’s clear best actress Oscar frontrunner for her work in Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland’s Still Alice — a drama in which she plays a middle-aged academic diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease — won’t be the only person associated with that film to get a major Oscar push this year, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

Sony Pictures Classics, which picked up the film’s U.S. distribution rights at the Toronto International Film Festival, intends to mount an all-out campaign for several others associated with the film, including and especially Kristen Stewart in the best supporting actress category, who plays the daughter of Moore’s character.

“The picture is just a major achievement,” Michael Barker, co-chief of Sony Pictures Classics, told The Hollywood Reporter on Friday. (Sony Classics also distributed Glatzer and Westmoreland’s Quinceanera, the winner of the 2006 Sundance Film Festival’s grand jury and audience awards.) “It’s a drama that embraces life and that captures the complexities of life. We see that very rarely in movies — although we at Sony Classics saw that not so long ago with Amour.”

“In addition to the depth of its screenplay and direction, it features several major performances,” Barker continued. “There’s no question that Julianne Moore gives the greatest performance of her career to date — it’s a performance of such amazing depth and subtlety — but one of the reasons it comes off so spectacularly well is that the actors around her are so strong. Kristen Stewart has never been better than she is in this film. Alec Baldwin gives one of the strongest performances of his career. And, in addition to that, you’ve got Kate Bosworth and Hunter Parrish also giving really strong performances.”

Many observers have zeroed in on Stewart’s performance — as the daughter who both spars with and cares for her declining mother — as being particularly impressive, and Barker, who has never worked with the 24-year-old before but has long admired her from afar, agrees with that assessment. “Kristen Stewart is someone we have seen in many movies over the last several years — four in 2014, with three coming up in 2015 so far — and she has shown great range in such a wide variety of genres,” he said. “But there is something about this performance that has new depths that she hasn’t shown before. She’s really terrific in the film.”

So what will an Oscar campaign for Stewart, as well as the others, look like? “Not only do you send the DVDs, but you have ads and screenings and try to point out these categories for attention.” And will Stewart, one of the busier A-listers in the business, be available to do the interviews, glad-handing and baby-kissing that have become essential to most successful Oscar campaigns in the present day? “As far as I know, she’s fully supportive of this film in a major way,” Barker said. “We certainly are.”

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Here are some new/old Outtakes of Kristen from 2008, during a Portrait session at the Sundance Film Festival

Photoshoots – 2008 – Sundance Film Festival Portraits

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